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Links, 08-10-2005

Albert Mohler continues with part 2 of his article on expository preaching:

If preaching is central to Christian worship, what kind of preaching are we talking about? The sheer weightlessness of much contemporary preaching is a severe indictment of our superficial Christianity. When the pulpit ministry lacks substance, the church is severed from the word of God, and its health and faithfulness are immediately diminished.

Many evangelicals are seduced by the proponents of topical and narrative preaching. The declarative force of Scripture is blunted by a demand for story, and the textual shape of the Bible is supplanted by topical considerations. In many pulpits, the Bible, if referenced at all, becomes merely a source for pithy aphorisms or convenient narratives.

The therapeutic concerns of the culture too often set the agenda for evangelical preaching. Issues of the self predominate, and the congregation expects to hear simple answers to complex problems. Furthermore, postmodernism claims intellectual primacy in the culture, and even if they do not surrender entirely to doctrinal relativism, the average congregant expects to make his or her own final decisions about all important issues of life, from worldview to lifestyle.
Expository Preaching and the Recovery of Worship (Part Two)

Doug McHone is still writing his series on church growth. Do you suppose it will go for forty days? Another guy had some success with that. Nah. Doug’s approach is different, a little more… Biblical.

I read a quote a few months ago that said that the first step toward salvation is the realization that you don’t deserve it. While I had to agree with that statement, I didn’t understand it as well as I do now. I imagine that I will understand it better and better during my sanctification. It does hold water, though. When someone says that they said a prayer and “got saved” the first question they should be asked is what, exactly, they were saved from. The more we understand the burden lifted from us, the more we will delight our personal worship time. The original question ties right in to the societal definition of the gospel.
Church Growth… The Biblical Way: Preach the Gospel

Thomas Sowell reminds us that there are heroes in Iraq, regardless of what the news media tells us.

The plain fact is that the mainstream media have been too busy depicting our troops as victims to have much time left to tell about the heroic things they have done, the far greater casualties which they have inflicted on their enemies, or their attempts to restore some basic services and basic decencies to this country that has been torn apart for years by internal and external wars -- even before the first American troops arrived on the scene.
Trashing our history: troops in Iraq

2005-08-10 at 9:02 AM MT | |